Featured Casino
Featured Casino

Blackjack's The Silberstang System

This system was written by Edwin Silberstang. Silberstang's approach is a kind of compendium of several similar systems and is quite attractive in its simplicity. Though its mathematics is beyond our present scope, its modus operandi can be easily explained.

The heart of the Silberstang system is card evaluation. That is, the player gives a value to every card in play, his own, the dealer's, the other players', as many of the cards as are exposed. He does not actually memorize these cards, however. He assigns them arbitrary numerations.

Let's explain. All cards numbered 2 through 7 in the Silberstang system are arbitrarily given a numerical value of plus 1. All cards from 9 through king and ace equal minus 1. And the 8 is neutral.

Now the player begins. He looks at the cards on the board. He totals them up according to the assigned values just given. And he goes by this rule: if all the cards added and subtracted together according to the above values give him a plus score, that is, if after he has added up all the assigned values of the cards and comes out with a plus rather than a minus, then the betting is in his favor. If a minus or neutral score comes up, it is against him. On the minus counts he should then bet a minimum amount, on the plus a maximum. Simple and precise.

Further rules: when the scores add up to plus 1 or plus 2, the player should bet two chips of whatever unit value he is betting. When plus 3 or 4 he bets four chips. When plus 5 or plus 6 he bets six chips. Above plus 6 he bets eight chips. Silberstang warns, however: don't make sudden leaps in your betting habits. Don't increase your bets out of proportion to your previous rhythm of play.

Some further points: 1. When you have plus 6 or more take insurance. 2. Never split aces if you have a count of minus 6 or more, except when you are up against a low card, that is, a 2 to a 6. 3. If you have minus 6 or more and the dealer is showing a 7, 8, 9, 10, or ace don't double down on a hard 10. If the dealer is showing a 2 to a 6 then do double down on a hard 10. 4. If you have plus 6 or more, don't draw to a hard 16 or against the dealer if he is showing a 7. 5. Play two hands at a time, but no more. This gives you the advantage of seeing more cards and making more profits. Silberstang, moreover, suggests that players avoid casinos where the cards are dealt down if using this system, he points out, too, that in this case a multiple deck can be of value if dealt from a shoe, as all the cards in play will be seen.

Close